Literary Fiction

Literary fiction is a term that has come into common usage in the early 1960s. The term is principally used to distinguish “serious fiction” which is a work that claims to hold literary merit, in comparison from genre fiction and popular fiction.

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves

I came to this novel with very little idea of what it was about. The title, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, doesn’t give any indication. And the cover is...
Eileen

Eileen

I came to Eileen with little to no idea what it was about. I mean, I had a vague notion that it was about a girl or woman named Eileen, but I think the title probably...
Point Omega

Point Omega

It's been a bit since I picked up a Don DeLillo book. Truth be told, there was a time when I picked them up quite a bit. But I've sworn off the whole post-modern thing...
Here I Am

Here I Am

Look, man, I'm a Foerhead. Ok, that doesn't exactly roll off the tongue, but suffice it to say that I'm a fan of Foer's work and had been waiting with baited br...
A Doubter's Almanac

A Doubter’s Almanac

This feels like a book that in 2001 would have been as popular as The Corrections. But given what feels like both an oversaturation of the book market with the ...
2666

2666

An epic, 900-page novel made up of five books and loosely centered around hundreds of murders of young women in Mexico sounds like just the kind of light readin...
The Pale King

The Pale King

Nobody ever said David Foster Wallace was an easy read. Granted, some of his books are easier than others. I got through Infinite Jest, with all of its end note...
Tinkers

Tinkers

Tinkers is what they (or I) call a small book. In stature. In scope. In just about everything. From the very first sentence it feels like a writing assignment f...
The Lay of the Land

The Lay of the Land

Having read both The Sportswriter and Independence Day (although not in the correct order) it only made sense for me to read this, the third book in the trilogy...
Theft

Theft

Peter Carey is quickly becoming one of my favorite storytellers. The guy can spin a yarn with the best of them, without stooping to the level of commercial blec...
Seven Types of Ambuguity

Seven Types of Ambiguity

Ambiguity is one of those words that I only understand in context. As a stand-alone word, it's slippery and ever-morphing. I'd be hard-pressed to come up with a...
Black Dogs

Black Dogs

I'm not even really sure where to begin with this one. To call it a throw-away would be to demean the author's obvious talents. But to praise it as a stunning m...
The Sea

The Sea

There's something about the way that Banville writes that just kind of casts a pall over everything. I guess the best adjective I can come up with is somber. Th...
The Mezzanine

The Mezzanine

In college we did some pretty nerdy stuff. For instance, we named all of the rooms in our fraternity based on that semester's occupants and the general personal...
Disgrace

Disgrace

Every time I talk to a friend going to Africa on safari I worry whether or not he or she will come home alive. It's a morbid thought, I know, but in a country s...
Under the Volcano

Under the Volcano

I seriously had to fight not to put this one down. It has to be called a ''classic'' for a reason. Maybe I'm missing the subtle subtext and biting social commen...
Strong Motion

Strong Motion

I think I went one book too deep into Franzen's catalog. Granted, this is the second of his three novels, but it certainly felt like a debut. It was all elbows ...
Yellow Dog

Yellow Dog

I've pissed off more than one person recommending Martin Amis books. They're not for everyone--and at times they honestly aren't for me. Yellow Dog is a tough o...